Eyes Home > Ciloxan Dosage

When using Ciloxan, your dosage will vary depending on the Ciloxan product used and the type of infection being treated. Although you should start feeling better within a few days of starting treatment with this medication, it is important to finish the full course of Ciloxan. Stopping the medication too soon may cause your infection to return or lead to antibiotic resistance.

An Introduction to Your Dose of Ciloxan

The dose of Ciloxan® (ciprofloxacin ophthalmic) your healthcare provider recommends will vary, depending on:
 
  • The type of infection being treated
  • The specific Ciloxan product you will use.
     
As is always the case, do not adjust your dosage unless your healthcare provider specifically tells you to do so.
 

Ciloxan Dosage for Conjunctivitis

The standard dosage of Ciloxan liquid eye drop to treat bacterial conjunctivitis (commonly called pink eye) is one or two drops in the infected eye every two hours while awake for two days, and then one to two drops every four hours while awake for five more days.
 
The standard dosing of Ciloxan eye ointment to treat bacterial conjunctivitis is a ½-inch ribbon applied to the infected eye three times a day for two days, then two times a day for five more days.
 
When using Ciloxan for conjunctivitis, the medication should be inserted into the conjunctival sac. This is the space between the eyelids and the eye. You can access the conjunctival sac by pulling down the lower eyelid gently with your finger to form a pocket. Insert or apply the medication into this pocket.
 

Ciloxan Dosage for Corneal Ulcer

When treating a corneal ulcer, Ciloxan eye drops are dosed very frequently, especially in the first couple of days of treatment. The standard Ciloxan dose on day one is two drops into the affected eye every 15 minutes for the first six hours, and then two drops every 30 minutes for the remainder of the day. The dose is then reduced to two drops every hour on day two, and two drops every four hours on days 3 through 14.
 
In some cases, treatment may be needed for longer than 14 days.
 
Written by/reviewed by:
Last reviewed by: Kristi Monson, PharmD;
Last updated/reviewed:
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