Eyes Articles A-Z

Macular Pucker Causes - Ocufen Medication Information

This page contains links to eMedTV Eyes Articles containing information on subjects from Macular Pucker Causes to Ocufen Medication Information. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Macular Pucker Causes
    The specific cause of macular pucker (scar tissue on the retina) is unknown. However, as this eMedTV resource explains, there are a number of known risk factors, such as eye injury and diabetes. This page describes possible macular pucker causes.
  • Macular Pucker Information
    If you are looking for information on macular pucker, this eMedTV article is a great place to start. It explains what a macular pucker is and lists some of its most common symptoms. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Macular Pucker Research
    As this eMedTV page explains, current research on macular pucker focuses on answering important questions about the disorder and developing new ways to treat it. This eMedTV page provides an overview of macular pucker research.
  • Macular Pucker Symptoms
    Macular pucker symptoms can include blurry vision, difficulty seeing fine details, and a small blind spot. This eMedTV page looks at these and other possible macular pucker symptoms and explains how a macular pucker affects a person's central vision.
  • Macular Pucker Treatments
    As this eMedTV page explains, treatment is usually not necessary for macular pucker, since the condition rarely affects a person's daily activities. This page discusses possible treatment options, including a surgery called vitrectomy.
  • Macular Pucker Vitrectomy
    As this eMedTV article explains, a macular pucker vitrectomy is a procedure in which the vitreous gel in the eye is replaced with saltwater, and scar tissue is removed. This page explains the procedure in detail, including what to expect afterwards.
  • Major Cataract Surgery Complications
    This video clips introduces major complications that may occur with cataract surgery.
  • Maxidex
    Maxidex is an eye drop prescribed to treat swelling of the eyes and eyelids due to certain eye conditions. This eMedTV article provides an overview of this medicine, including details on how it works, potential side effects, dosing tips, and more.
  • Maxidex Adverse Reaction
    As this eMedTV article discusses, Maxidex is not free from risks. This Web resource describes some of the adverse reactions to using Maxidex eye drops and explains how you can help reduce the chance of such problems. This page also links to more details.
  • Maxidex and Breastfeeding
    It is unknown if Maxidex (dexamethasone ophthalmic suspension) passes through human breast milk. This eMedTV page explains how no research has been done on the potential risks of breastfeeding while using Maxidex, and why problems are unlikely to occur.
  • Maxidex and Pregnancy
    If you are expecting, tell your doctor before using Maxidex. This eMedTV page describes the problems that occurred when pregnant animals were given the drug's active ingredient, and explains why Maxidex is a pregnancy Category C drug.
  • Maxidex Dosage
    Your dose of Maxidex will depend on the type and severity of your eye condition. This page from the eMedTV Web site discusses specific dosing guidelines for this drug. A list of important recommendations for using this eye medicine is also provided.
  • Maxidex Drug Interactions
    You may not be able to use certain eye medications along with Maxidex, as it may slow the healing process. This eMedTV page lists some of the drugs that may cause negative interactions with Maxidex, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory eye medicines.
  • Maxidex Eye Drop Information
    Maxidex is a prescription eye drop used to treat swelling of the eye caused by certain eye problems. This eMedTV article offers more information on Maxidex, including how to use this eye drop, possible side effects, and general safety precautions.
  • Maxidex Overdose
    People who use too much Maxidex may experience eye irritation, such as stinging, burning, or discomfort. This eMedTV resource describes what to expect with a Maxidex overdose, including details on how a doctor may treat any problems that occur.
  • Maxidex Side Effects
    Temporary eye burning, redness, and stinging are among the possible side effects of Maxidex. This eMedTV segment lists several other possible reactions to this eye drop, including potentially serious problems that require immediate medical attention.
  • Maxidex Uses
    Maxidex eye drops are prescribed for treating eye swelling caused by certain infections or eye conditions. This eMedTV page further describes specific uses for Maxidex, including possible off-label (unapproved) uses, and explains how this drug works.
  • Maxidex Vision Loss
    Notify your doctor right away if you experience any vision loss while using Maxidex. This selection from the eMedTV Web library takes a closer look at the potential vision problems this eye drop may cause. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Maxidex Warning
    You may not be able to use Maxidex safely if you have a certain type of eye infection. This eMedTV resource explores other safety warnings with Maxidex and discusses what you should be aware of before starting treatment with this eye drop.
  • Maxidex Warnings and Precautions
    You should not use Maxidex if you have a viral, fungal, or tuberculosis eye infection. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at other important precautions and warnings for Maxidex, including a list of potential problems this eye medicine may cause.
  • Mechanical Failure During LASIK Eye Surgery
    All surgical procedures have the risk of mechanical failure. During LASIK eye surgery, as this eMedTV segment explains, mechanical failure will result in a delayed surgery, and mechanical problems with the microkeratome can cause flap complications.
  • Metipranolol
    Metipranolol is a prescription eye drop used to lower eye pressure in people with certain eye conditions. This eMedTV resource covers metipranolol uses in more detail, explains how the drug works, and offers dosing information for the product.
  • Metipranolol Dosage
    The usual starting dosage of metipranolol is one drop in the affected eye twice a day. As this eMedTV article explains, this is a standard dose, regardless of the severity of your condition. If it is not adequate, your doctor may add another medication.
  • Metipranolol Medication Information
    As this eMedTV page explains, metipranolol is a type of medicated eye drop. This article has more information on metipranolol, including how this prescription medication works. A link to more details is also included.
  • Minor Cataract Surgery Complications
    This video segment discusses possible minor complications with cataract surgery.
  • Mitomycin Ophthalmic
    Mitomycin ophthalmic is a prescription medicine used during glaucoma surgery. This eMedTV Web selection offers an in-depth look at this drug, providing details on how it is applied, possible side effects, general safety precautions, and more.
  • Mitomycin Ophthalmic Dosage
    As this eMedTV segment explains, the dose of mitomycin ophthalmic is the same for everyone. This page further discusses what to expect when receiving this medication. It also outlines some tips for when and how this product is applied.
  • Mitomycin Ophthalmic Information
    Mitomycin ophthalmic is prescribed for use during glaucoma surgery to help prevent scarring. This eMedTV page features more information on mitomycin ophthalmic, including potential side effects, safety issues to be aware of, and how the drug is applied.
  • Mitomycin Ophthalmic Side Effects
    Infections and decreased vision are some of the possible side effects of mitomycin ophthalmic. This eMedTV page further explores possible reactions to this drug. It also explains why there are not detailed statistics on how often these side effects occur.
  • Mitomycin Opthalmic
    Mitomycin ophthalmic is a prescription medicine used during glaucoma surgery. This eMedTV Web selection explains how this drug works and lists some of its potential side effects. Mitomycin opthalmic is a common misspelling of mitomycin ophthalmic.
  • Mitomycin Trabeculectomy Dosing
    If you have an upcoming trabeculectomy surgery, you may receive mitomycin ophthalmic. This eMedTV page offers dosing guidelines for this eye medication, including how it works, how it is applied, and how it can help make a trabeculectomy successful.
  • Mitomycin-C Concentration for Ophthalmic Surgery
    This eMedTV article explains how the concentration of mitomycin-C is calculated for ophthalmic surgery for glaucoma. This resource explains how this medication is prepared and applied. It also offers a link to more dosing information on this drug.
  • Moving to the Recovery Room (LASIK)
    This video explains what to expect in the recovery room after your LASIK procedure.
  • Moving to the Recovery Room (PRK)
    This video explains what to expect in the recovery room after your LASIK procedure.
  • Moving to the Recovery Room After Cataract Surgery
    This clip explains what will happen after you are moved to the recovery room after surgery.
  • Moxeza
    Available as an eye drop, Moxeza is prescribed to treat bacterial conjunctivitis ("pink eye"). This page of the eMedTV site takes an in-depth look at this antibiotic, with details on how it works, side effects, how to apply it, safety concerns, and more.
  • Moxeza and Breastfeeding
    It is unclear if Moxeza passes through human breast milk. This article from the eMedTV Web library takes an in-depth look at breastfeeding and Moxeza, explaining why it is probably unlikely that the medicine in the eye drop would reach a nursing infant.
  • Moxeza and Pregnancy
    If you are pregnant, you may be wondering if you can use Moxeza eye drops. This eMedTV Web page addresses this topic and explains why the FDA has given Moxeza a pregnancy Category C rating. The results of animal studies are also included.
  • Moxeza Dosage
    To treat pink eye, the standard dose of Moxeza is one drop in the affected eye twice daily for seven days. This eMedTV Web article further discusses dosing guidelines and lists tips for how to safely and effectively use this eye drop.
  • Moxeza Drug Interactions
    Currently, there are no known Moxeza drug interactions. However, as explained in this eMedTV Web page, it is possible that not all interactions are known at this time, so tell your doctor about all medications you are taking before using this eye drop.
  • Moxeza Medication Information
    This part of the eMedTV site provides information on Moxeza, a medication prescribed to treat an eye infection known as conjunctivitis ("pink eye"). This article gives a brief overview of how this product is used and provides a link to more details.
  • Moxeza Overdose
    It is unlikely that using too much Moxeza in the eyes would cause any dangerous or long-lasting problems. This eMedTV article offers more details on what to expect with an overdose, with information on how a doctor may treat any problems that might occur.
  • Moxeza Side Effects
    Fever and eye irritation are possible side effects that may occur during treatment with Moxeza. This eMedTV Web selection outlines other possible side effects of this eye drop, including allergic reactions that may require medical attention.
  • Moxeza Uses
    If you have an eye infection known as "pink eye," your doctor may prescribe Moxeza eye drops. This eMedTV resource talks about the uses of Moxeza, with information on the signs of conjunctivitis and details on whether children can use these eye drops.
  • Moxeza Warnings and Precautions
    Do not to wear contact lenses while using Moxeza to treat an eye infection. This page of the eMedTV Web site describes other warnings and precautions for Moxeza, with details on what to discuss with your healthcare provider before using these eye drops.
  • Natural Cure for Blepharitis
    There is no natural cure for blepharitis -- or traditional cure. But since blepharitis is a chronic condition, some people try alternative treatments. This eMedTV article covers questions to ask the doctor about natural treatments for blepharitis.
  • Nearsightedness
    This interactive video segment describes what nearsightedness is and what causes it.
  • Ocufen
    Ocufen is a medicine prescribed for use before surgery to help keep the pupils from dilating. This eMedTV Web page offers an overview of this eye medicine, including details on how it works, potential side effects, and dosing instructions.
  • Ocufen and Breastfeeding
    It is known that the active ingredient in Ocufen (flurbiprofen ophthalmic) passes through breast milk. This eMedTV page explains whether the amount passed through breast milk would be enough to cause problems and covers the manufacturer's recommendations.
  • Ocufen and Pregnancy
    It may not be safe to use Ocufen (flurbiprofen ophthalmic) if you are expecting. This page of the eMedTV Web site explains why Ocufen is classified as a pregnancy Category C medication, with details on animal studies, likely outcomes in humans, and more.
  • Ocufen Dosage
    The standard dosing guidelines for Ocufen call for one drop to be applied to the eye every half hour. This eMedTV article discusses how long the drops are used and also provides some other helpful tips on how to use these eye drops.
  • Ocufen Drug Interactions
    Steroid eye medications and anticoagulants are some of the drugs that can cause interactions with Ocufen. This eMedTV Web selection examines a number of products that may cause problems with this eye drop and explains how to avoid adverse reactions.
  • Ocufen Medication Information
    Ocufen is prescribed to keep the pupils from becoming too small during eye surgery. This eMedTV article gives an overview of Ocufen, with information on how to use the medication and possible side effects that may occur with these eye drops.
Terms of Use
Advertise with Us
Contact Us
About eMedTV
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2006-2014 Clinaero, Inc.
eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.