Eyes Articles A-Z

Diagnosing Cataracts - Ketotifen and Breastfeeding

This page contains links to eMedTV Eyes Articles containing information on subjects from Diagnosing Cataracts to Ketotifen and Breastfeeding. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Diagnosing Cataracts
    Diagnosing cataracts involves an examination of the eye and tests (such as a dilated eye exam). This eMedTV article discusses the process used to make a cataract diagnosis, including information about tests used to identify cataracts.
  • Does Lutein Work?
    Lutein may have several benefits for eye health and may help diminish wrinkles. This eMedTV segment describes the research conducted on the effectiveness of lutein, including information on which uses may be more effective than others.
  • Does Vitamin A Work?
    People taking vitamin A for uses other than a deficiency may wonder if vitamin A works. This page from the eMedTV archives explores the effectiveness of vitamin A supplementation for conditions other than nutritional deficiencies.
  • Dorzolamide
    If you have high eye pressure, your healthcare provider may prescribe dorzolamide eye drops. This eMedTV page offers more details on how this product works to lower eye pressure and gives a general overview of side effects, dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Dorzolamide Dosage
    The usual dosage of dorzolamide is one drop in the affected eye(s) three times daily. This eMedTV resource further explains the dosing guidelines for the eye drops, including what your doctor may recommend if you are not getting the desired results.
  • Dorzolamide Drug Information
    Dorzolamide is a prescription eye drop used to lower eye pressure. This eMedTV selection provides more information on the drug, with details on how and when to take it. A link to more information on the medicine is also included.
  • Dorzolamide Eye Drops
    Available as an eye drop, dorzolamide is a medicine used to lower eye pressure. This eMedTV article briefly describes the drug and explains how it works. A link to more detailed information on dorzolamide is also included.
  • Dorzolamide HCL
    If you have high eye pressure, your healthcare provider may prescribe dorzolamide hydrochloride (HCl). This eMedTV Web page offers a brief overview of these eye drops, explaining how to use them and listing some potential side effects.
  • Dorzolamide/Timolol
    Dorzolamide/timolol is commonly prescribed for the treatment of glaucoma and intraocular hypertension. This eMedTV resource provides a detailed look at this prescription medicine, with information on dosing, side effects, safety concerns, and more.
  • Dorzolamide/Timolol Dosage
    There are no extenuating factors that affect the dose of dorzolamide/timolol a person is prescribed. This eMedTV resource explains why, describes when and how to use this eye drop, and offers a few guidelines that ensure a safe, effective treatment.
  • Dorzolamide/Timolol Drug Information
    This segment of the eMedTV Web site provides some important information on dorzolamide/timolol, a drug used to decrease pressure in the eye. This page briefly explains how this medicine works and what to tell the healthcare provider prescribing it.
  • Drug Interactions With Alcaftadine
    Currently, there are no known drug interactions with alcaftadine. As this eMedTV page explains, however, it is possible that interactions with the eye drop may be discovered, so make sure your doctor knows about all other medicines you are taking.
  • Drug Interactions With Bimatoprost
    Other eye drops can cause potentially dangerous drug interactions with bimatoprost. This article from the eMedTV library lists some of the types of eye drops that may interact with bimatoprost and describes the potential effects of these interactions.
  • Drug Interactions With Brimonidine
    Antidepressants and blood pressure medicines are some drugs that can react negatively with brimonidine. This eMedTV page lists other medicines that may cause potentially serious drug interactions with brimonidine and describes the problems that can occur.
  • Drug Interactions With Brimonidine/Timolol
    When brimonidine/timolol is taken with reserpine or certain other medications, drug interactions may occur. This eMedTV page includes a list of products that may react with the eye drop and describes the potential problems that can occur.
  • Drug Interactions With Brinzolamide
    As this eMedTV Web resource explains, brinzolamide drug interactions can occur with several substances, including aspirin and other eye medications. This article lists other drugs that may cause reactions and describes what your doctor may recommend.
  • Drug Interactions With Dorzolamide
    This eMedTV page explains why dorzolamide can interact with other eye medications, aspirin, and other drugs. This resource offers a more detailed list of potential interactions and explains why it's important to discuss this issue with your doctor.
  • Drug Interactions With Dorzolamide/Timolol
    Aspirin, epinephrine, digoxin, and other drugs can interact with dorzolamide/timolol. This page from the eMedTV site provides a detailed list of the medicines that can react negatively with dorzolamide/timolol and the problems that may occur as a result.
  • Drug Interactions With Ketotifen
    Significant ketotifen drug interactions are not likely to occur. As this eMedTV page explains, this is because very little ketotifen actually reaches the bloodstream (as it is an eye drop), making it unlikely to interact with other medications.
  • Drug Interactions With Latanoprost
    Bimatoprost, NSAID eye drops, and any other eye drops may cause drug interactions with latanoprost. As this eMedTV Web page explains, these interactions could reduce the effectiveness of latanoprost or cause other problems.
  • Drug Interactions With Levobunolol
    This eMedTV page lists several medications (such as digoxin and methacholine) that can lead to drug interactions with levobunolol. This article also takes a look at some of the complications these interactions can cause.
  • Drug Interactions With Levofloxacin Ophthalmic Solution
    There are no known drug interactions with levofloxacin ophthalmic solution at this time. As this page from the eMedTV Web library explains, however, it is possible that interactions with this eye medication may be discovered at a later date.
  • Drug Interactions With Metipranolol
    Digoxin, methacholine, and other medications may cause metipranolol drug interactions. This eMedTV article lists other drugs that may interfere with metipranolol and describes the problems that may occur if these medicines are taken together.
  • Drug Interactions With Mitomycin Ophthalmic
    At this time, there are no known drug interactions with mitomycin ophthalmic. However, as this eMedTV resource explains, adverse reactions may be discovered at a later date, so make sure your doctor knows about all other products you are taking.
  • Drug Interactions With Pegaptanib
    Since pegaptanib is injected into the eye, very little of the drug reaches the bloodstream. As this eMedTV page explains, drug interactions with pegaptanib are unlikely because the rest of the body is exposed to very low amounts of the medication.
  • Drug Interactions With Ranibizumab
    Since the body is exposed to low ranibizumab levels, other medicines shouldn't interact with it. As this eMedTV page explains, drug interactions with ranibizumab are unlikely because it is injected into the eye and won't fully enter the bloodstream.
  • Drug Interactions With Tafluprost
    Before using tafluprost, let your doctor know if you are using any other eye drops or other medications. This eMedTV resource examines various drugs that may interact with tafluprost ophthalmic solution.
  • Drug Interactions With Timolol
    Digoxin, calcium channel blockers, and epinephrine are some drugs that can react negatively with timolol. This eMedTV page lists other medicines that may cause potentially dangerous drug interactions with timolol and describes the problems that can occur.
  • Drug Interactions With Travoprost
    Other eyedrops can cause potentially dangerous drug interactions with travoprost. As this eMedTV segment explains, to prevent any interaction, you must wait at least five minutes after taking your travoprost dose before using any other eyedrops.
  • Drug Interactions With Unoprostone Ophthalmic Solution
    Bimatoprost and certain other eye drops can interact with unoprostone ophthalmic solution. This eMedTV Web page takes a closer look at reactions with this prescription medicine and explains how you can reduce your risk of problems.
  • Dry Eye Relief
    The information presented in this eMedTV article includes suggestions for dry eye relief in both mild and severe cases. Suggestions range from avoiding sources of irritation to artificial tears and eye ointment to surgery.
  • Dry Eyes After LASIK
    This portion of the eMedTV Web site explains how common it is to experience LASIK-related dry eye. This article also discusses who is more likely to be affected, how long dry eyes are expected to last, and various treatment options.
  • Epithelial Complications After LASIK Eye Surgery
    Epithelial complications after LASIK eye surgery, while rare, won't affect the final outcome. However, as this eMedTV page explains, they may lead to a delayed condition called epithelial ingrowth, which is either left alone or removed surgically.
  • Expected Results With LASIK
    Improved eyesight with 20/40, 20/20, or 20/25 vision are the expected results with LASIK. This eMedTV page further discusses what you can expect with this procedure, including potential vision quality problems and the need for enhancement surgery.
  • Expected Results With the LASIK Procedure
    This video clip discusses what kind of results to expect following your LASIK procedure.
  • Expected Results With the PRK Procedure
    Certain results can be expected with this procedure. This video segment describes what these are.
  • Eye Exam Recommendations
    Eye exam recommendations provide guidelines on how often exams should take place. This part of the eMedTV library includes a chart that offers general recommendations (based on age and symptoms) on how often you should see your eye care professional.
  • Eyes
    This video clip discusses the parts of the eye involved with sight.
  • Eyesight Correction
    This clip explains why people may need corrective lenses or surgery to correct their vision.
  • Eyesight Correction (PRK)
    This clip explains why people may need corrective lenses or surgery to correct their vision.
  • Farsightedness
    This video segment explains farsightedness, or presbyopia, including what causes it.
  • Final Thoughts -- LASIK Complications
    This video clip gives some final thoughts regarding possible complications with LASIK.
  • Flap Complications After LASIK Eye Surgery
    Flap complications after LASIK eye surgery range from an irregular or incomplete flap to a "free cap." This eMedTV resource describes these and other flap complications and explains how they are treated and how they affect the outcome of surgery.
  • Generic Alphagan P
    As this time, a generic is available for the higher strength of Alphagan P, but not for the lower strength. This eMedTV page discusses when a generic Alphagan 0.1% may become available and describes other generics that may be possible alternatives.
  • Generic Betoptic
    Regular Betoptic (betaxolol) is available in generic form, but generic Betoptic S is not available yet. This eMedTV resource explains why only one form of Betoptic is available as a generic and offers manufacturer information for the generic product.
  • Generic Bromday
    As this page from the eMedTV Web site explains, Bromday (bromfenac) is now available in both brand-name and generic form. This article tells you what you need to know about the generic version of this drug, including how it compares to brand-name Bromday.
  • Generic Ciloxan
    As this eMedTV page explains, there are generic Ciloxan (ciprofloxacin ophthalmic) liquid eye drops available, but the ointment is only available in brand-name form. This page also explains whether the generics are as good as the brand-name drug.
  • Generic for Zymar
    Is there a generic for Zymar? As this eMedTV page explains, no generic versions are being made at the moment, but this could change in the future. This article offers a brief overview of brand-name Zymar and provides a link to more information on it.
  • Generic Iquix
    At this time, generic Iquix is not available. However, as this eMedTV page explains, a generic version could be expected in the future. This page also explains why Iquix and Quixin are not interchangeable although they have the same active ingredient.
  • Generic Lotemax
    As this eMedTV article explains, there are no generic Lotemax (loteprednol) products available at this time. This page discusses why there are currently no generic versions of this eye medication and explains when a generic might become available.
  • Generic Maxidex
    There are no generic Maxidex (dexamethasone ophthalmic suspension) products available at this time. This eMedTV segment talks about why a generic version of this drug doesn't exist and describes an alternative that your healthcare provider may recommend.
  • Generic Moxeza
    This eMedTV segment explains why there are currently no generic Moxeza products and discusses when a generic medication might become available. This article also describes the difference between the terms "generic name" and "generic version."
  • Generic Ocufen
    As this part of the eMedTV Web library explains, generic Ocufen (flurbiprofen ophthalmic) eye drops are currently available. This resource also talks about whether the generic product is as good as the brand-name medication.
  • Generic Ocuflox
    This eMedTV page explains that generic versions of Ocuflox (ofloxacin ophthalmic solution) are currently available. This article also covers how the FDA has determined that the generic versions are equivalent to the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Ocupress
    Ocupress (carteolol) eye drops are currently available in generic form. This article from the eMedTV archives describes the strengths available for generic Ocupress and explains whether these products are equivalent to the brand-name medication.
  • Generic Ozurdex
    This eMedTV page explains why Ozurdex (dexamethasone intravitreal implant) is not available in generic form. This page explores when a generic version could become available and explains the difference between a "generic name" and "generic version."
  • Generic Prolensa
    As this part of the eMedTV Web library explains, Prolensa (bromfenac) eye drops are only available in brand-name form. This article discusses why companies are not allowed to make generic Prolensa and explains when it might become available.
  • Generic Restasis
    No generic Restasis (cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion) products are currently available. This eMedTV page explains when a generic product may become available and explains why cyclosporine is the "generic name" of Restasis and not a generic version of it.
  • Generic Tobradex
    As this eMedTV article discusses, generic Tobradex (tobramycin and dexamethasone) is equivalent to the brand-name version. This page explains that only Tobradex suspension (eye drops) is available in generic form and offers a list of manufacturers.
  • Generic Voltaren Ophthalmic
    Generic forms of Voltaren Ophthalmic (diclofenac eye drops) are equivalent to the brand name version. This eMedTV page explains how the FDA has determined that these drugs are as effective as the brand-name drug and provides a list of manufacturers.
  • Generic Zymar
    This eMedTV Web article explains why a generic version of Zymar (gatifloxacin) is currently unavailable and when such a product might be expected. It also addresses the difference between the terms "generic name" and "generic version."
  • Generic Zymaxid
    As this eMedTV page explains, generic Zymaxid (gatifloxacin) is considered equivalent to the brand-name version of the drug. This article takes a closer look at the generic version, including who makes it, the strength in which it is sold, and more.
  • Getting Started (Cataract Sugery)
    This video explains what you need to do to prepare for your procedure.
  • Glare and Halos After LASIK
    It is not uncommon to experience glare and halos after LASIK eye surgery. As this eMedTV article explains, most patients experience glare or halos at night for the first few weeks to months after surgery, but these symptoms tend to improve over time.
  • How Safe Is Cataract Surgery?
    This clip discusses the general safety of cataract surgery and lists possible complications.
  • How Safe Is the LASIK Procedure?
    This video takes a look at the safety of the LASIK procedure.
  • How Safe Is the PRK Procedure?
    This multimedia clip discusses the safety and level of risk associated with this procedure.
  • Human Eye
    The cornea, iris, pupil, lens, and retina are some of the structures found inside the eye. This video clip describes these structures in greater detail.
  • In the Operating Room (Cataract Sugery)
    This video clips shows what you can expect upon entering an operating room.
  • Infection Following LASIK Eye Surgery
    With many medical procedures, there is a risk of developing an infection. Following LASIK eye surgery, as this eMedTV article explains, patients are given antibiotics to help prevent infections, so the chances are less than 1 in 1,000 patients.
  • Inflammation of the Eye Following LASIK
    Some patients have experienced inflammation of the eye following LASIK eye surgery. This page of the eMedTV Web site discusses the likelihood of developing eye inflammation, the potential complications it can cause, and treatment options available.
  • Information on Cataracts
    As explained in this selection from the eMedTV site, a cataract is a vision problem that occurs when the lens of the eye becomes cloudy. This article features more cataract information, such as symptoms that commonly occur with this condition.
  • Inside the Eye
    The cornea, iris, pupil, lens, and retina are some of the structures found inside the eye. This video clip describes these structures in greater detail.
  • Iquix
    The prescription eye drop Iquix is used to treat corneal ulcers, which are a type of eye infection. This eMedTV segment provides a detailed look at this medication, with information on when and how to use it, side effects, dosing, and more.
  • Iquix and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV article explains that if you are breastfeeding while using Iquix, even though the risk to your infant is minimal, you can take certain precautions to ensure his or her safety. This includes wiping away excess medication after applying a dose.
  • Iquix and Pregnancy
    This page from the eMedTV library explains why Iquix is considered a pregnancy Category C drug, based on the results of animal studies. This article also describes the system the FDA uses to rate the safety of drugs during pregnancy.
  • Iquix Dosage
    The specific Iquix dose your healthcare provider prescribes will depend on the severity of your infection. This eMedTV resource describes general dosing guidelines for this medicated eye drop, with important tips to ensure its effectiveness.
  • Iquix Drug Interactions
    This segment of the eMedTV archives explains why Iquix should not interact with other drugs. However, it also stresses that interactions cannot be ruled out and it is still important to tell your healthcare provider about any other drugs you are taking.
  • Iquix Eye Drops
    This page of the eMedTV site presents a basic overview of Iquix eye drops. It explains what this medication is used for, the typical course of treatment, possible side effects, and more. It also includes a link to more detailed information on the drug.
  • Iquix Medication Information
    This selection from the eMedTV archives provides important information on Iquix, a medication prescribed to treat corneal ulcers. This article includes basic dosing guidelines and what to discuss with your doctor before beginning treatment.
  • Iquix Overdose
    If too much Iquix is used, problems are expected to be minor; however, as this eMedTV article explains, medical care should still be sought. This segment lists the problems that might occur, as well as the likely treatment options in cases of overdose.
  • Iquix Side Effects
    Although most people have no problems with Iquix, side effects such as eye or throat irritation can occur. This eMedTV article lists both common side effects reported with this eye drop as well as problems that may require prompt medical care.
  • Iquix Uses
    The Food and Drug Administration has approved Iquix for the treatment of certain corneal ulcers. This eMedTV Web page explains in detail how Iquix works, when it is used, and whether children and older adults can use it.
  • Iquix Warnings and Precautions
    When treating a corneal ulcer with Iquix, you cannot wear contact lenses during treatment. This eMedTV resource lists other important Iquix warnings and precautions to be aware of, including when you should contact a healthcare provider.
  • Is Lutein Safe?
    You may not be able to use lutein if you have certain health conditions or are pregnant. This eMedTV page covers other important lutein safety warnings and precautions, and explains who should consult their doctor before using this product.
  • Ketotifen
    Ketotifen is an over-the-counter eye drop approved to relieve eye itching due to eye allergies. This eMedTV resource describes how the medication works, offers dosing information, and explains what side effects may occur with this product.
  • Ketotifen and Breastfeeding
    As this eMedTV article explains, ketotifen has not been studied in nursing women, so it is unknown if it passes through breast milk. This resource takes a closer look at ketotifen and breastfeeding, including tips on what to watch for in a nursing child.
Terms of Use
Advertise with Us
Contact Us
About eMedTV
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2006-2017 Clinaero, Inc.
eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.