Eyes Articles A-Z

Ocufen Overdose - Precautions and Warnings With Bimatoprost

This page contains links to eMedTV Eyes Articles containing information on subjects from Ocufen Overdose to Precautions and Warnings With Bimatoprost. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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  • Ocufen Overdose
    If you use too much Ocufen (flurbiprofen ophthalmic), flush your eye with clean water. This eMedTV segment describes what to expect with an overdose, including tips on what to do if you swallow the liquid.
  • Ocufen Side Effects
    This eMedTV resource explains that although the information on potential Ocufen side effects is vague, common problems include eye irritation, burning, and stinging. Other reactions to this eye drop are listed, including those that require medical care.
  • Ocufen Uses
    Ocufen eye drops are prescribed to keep the pupil from constricting during eye surgery. This eMedTV segment further describes this use of Ocufen, as well as a possible off-label (unapproved) use. This page also explains how Ocufen works.
  • Ocufen Warnings and Precautions
    Using Ocufen may increase your risk for slow wound healing and bleeding in the eye. This eMedTV segment takes an in-depth look at other important precautions and warnings for Ocufen, including information on who should not use this drug.
  • Ocuflox
    As a prescription eye drop, Ocuflox helps treat bacterial infections of the eye, such as pink eye. This eMedTV article describes this drug in more detail, taking a look at how it works, its dosing information, and possible side effects that may occur.
  • Ocuflox 0.3%
    The antibiotic eye drop Ocuflox is available as a 0.3% solution. This part of the eMedTV Web site offers a brief overview of Ocuflox, listing the eye infections it can treat and providing a link to more detailed information.
  • Ocuflox and Breastfeeding
    As an eye drop, Ocuflox (ofloxacin ophthalmic solution) is unlikely to reach the breast milk. This part of the eMedTV site talks about Ocuflox and breastfeeding, listing some of the extra precautions to take if you are nursing while using this drug.
  • Ocuflox and Pregnancy
    At this time, it is unclear if Ocuflox is completely safe during pregnancy. However, as this eMedTV article explains, the drug is not expected to cause problems, since it is an eye drop and very little medication is thought to reach the bloodstream.
  • Ocuflox Antibiotic Information
    As explained in this eMedTV article, Ocuflox is used to treat conjunctivitis and corneal ulcers that are caused by bacteria. This resource offers more information on Ocuflox, including what to discuss with your doctor before using this antibiotic.
  • Ocuflox Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, Ocuflox eye drops are typically used several times a day. This article covers dosing guidelines for Ocuflox in more detail, including some tips that can help ensure a safe, effective treatment process.
  • Ocuflox Drops in Infants
    This selection from the eMedTV Web site explains whether infants can use Ocuflox eye drops and gives a brief overview of what the medication is used for. A link to more detailed information on this topic is also included.
  • Ocuflox Drug Interactions
    In general, Ocuflox is not likely to cause interactions with other drugs. This eMedTV page discusses possible reactions with Ocuflox, with an explanation of why you should talk to your doctor about other medications you use, such as other eye drops.
  • Ocuflox Medication Information
    This page from the eMedTV library offers some basic information on Ocuflox, a prescription medication used for certain eye infections. This article describes how it works and lists side effects. A link to more details is also included.
  • Ocuflox Overdose
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, using too much Ocuflox (ofloxacin ophthalmic solution) in the eyes could lead to problems like eye irritation. This article takes a closer look at what to expect, as well as some potential symptoms of an oral overdose.
  • Ocuflox Side Effects
    Some of the most common side effects seen with Ocuflox include redness, itching, and stinging of the eye. This eMedTV page also outlines some of the more serious side effects that should be reported to a doctor, such as hives or worsening pain.
  • Ocuflox Uses
    The prescription drug Ocuflox has been approved to treat two types of bacterial eye infections. This eMedTV segment describes the uses of Ocuflox in more detail and lists some of the common symptoms of conjunctivitis and corneal ulcers.
  • Ocuflox Warnings and Precautions
    Although rare, severe allergic reactions are possible with Ocuflox. This page from the eMedTV Web site provides more warnings and precautions to be aware of before beginning treatment with Ocuflox, including what your healthcare provider needs to know.
  • Ocuflux
    Ocuflox is an antibiotic used for certain types of bacterial eye infections. This part of the eMedTV site gives a brief overview of this eye drop and provides a link to more information on it. Ocuflux is a common misspelling of Ocuflox.
  • Ocupress
    Ocupress is a prescription eye drop used to treat open angle glaucoma and high eye pressure. This eMedTV segment explores how Ocupress works, describes how to use the eye drop, and explains what side effects may occur with this medication.
  • Ocupress and Breastfeeding
    The full risks of using Ocupress (carteolol) while nursing are currently unknown. As this eMedTV segment explains, since no studies have been done on breastfeeding and Ocupress, it is not known whether this drug passes through breast milk.
  • Ocupress and Pregnancy
    At this time, it is not known whether Ocupress (carteolol) is safe to take if you're expecting. This eMedTV article provides more details on pregnancy and Ocupress, including information on what happened when this drug was given to pregnant animals.
  • Ocupress Dosage
    There is only one standard dose of Ocupress, regardless of your weight or the severity of your condition. As this eMedTV segment explains, the recommended starting dosage is one drop of the medication in the affected eye(s) twice daily.
  • Ocupress Drug Information
    A prescription eye drop, Ocupress is used to treat high eye pressure and open angle glaucoma. This eMedTV segment provides more information on Ocupress, including what to discuss with your healthcare provider before starting this drug.
  • Ocupress Drug Interactions
    If you take Ocupress with methacholine, reserpine, or other beta blockers, drug interactions may occur. As this eMedTV page explains, drug interactions with Ocupress could lead to serious side effects (such as severe, asthma-like breathing problems).
  • Ocupress Overdose
    It is not known exactly what to expect from an overdose of Ocupress (carteolol). This page from the eMedTV library lists some of the predicted effects of an overdose and explains what steps your healthcare provider may take to treat the overdose.
  • Ocupress Side Effects
    Eye redness, burning, and irritation are some of the most commonly reported side effects of Ocupress. This eMedTV resource lists other common side effects, as well as rare but potentially serious problems that require medical attention.
  • Ocupress Uses
    Ocupress can help lower eye pressure in people with open angle glaucoma or high eye pressure. This eMedTV Web page discusses the uses of Ocupress in more detail, explains how the drug works, and explores the use of this medicine in children.
  • Ocupress Warnings and Precautions
    You may not be able to safely use Ocupress if you have asthma. This eMedTV page offers more information on who should not use this drug. Warnings and precautions on what side effects may occur with Ocupress are also included in this article.
  • On the Day of Your LASIK Procedure
    This video explains what you will need to do the day of your LASIK procedure.
  • On the Day of Your PRK
    This video explains what you will need to do the day of your LASIK procedure.
  • Other LASIK Complications
    This video explains how often major complications occur with LASIK.
  • Ozurdex
    Ozurdex is injected directly into the eye to treat macular edema and uveitis. This part of the eMedTV site talks about this prescription drug in detail, giving an overview of how it works, how it is administered, possible side effects, and more.
  • Ozurdex and Breastfeeding
    It is unclear if Ozurdex (dexamethasone intravitreal implant) passes through breast milk. This eMedTV segment talks about breastfeeding and Ozurdex, explaining why problems are unlikely -- and why it's still important to talk to your healthcare provider.
  • Ozurdex and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV page discusses the potential risks of using Ozurdex (dexamethasone intravitreal implant) during pregnancy. This page covers the effects of the drug on offspring in animal studies and explains when it may be recommended for pregnant women.
  • Ozurdex Dosage
    This portion of the eMedTV library provides dosing guidelines for Ozurdex, a prescription eye medication. It explains how the implant is administered, discusses follow-up care, and explains what to do if you have any questions about your dose.
  • Ozurdex Drug Eye Implant
    This part of the eMedTV Web site offers some basic drug information on Ozurdex, an implant used to treat certain eye conditions. This article gives a brief overview of the medication and provides a link to more detailed information on it.
  • Ozurdex Drug Interactions
    Medications that can react with Ozurdex include Acuvail, Nevanac, and other NSAID eye medicines. This eMedTV segment outlines other drugs that can interact with Ozurdex and describes the potential consequences of these reactions.
  • Ozurdex Medication Information
    If you have macular edema from retinal vein occlusion, your healthcare provider may recommend Ozurdex. This eMedTV selection offers important information on Ozurdex, listing some of the medication's side effects and providing a link to more details.
  • Ozurdex Overdose
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, using too much Ozurdex (dexamethasone intravitreal implant) could lead to eye pain, blurred vision, and other symptoms. This article offers more overdose information on this steroid eye medication.
  • Ozurdex Side Effects
    Eye redness, cataract, and increased pressure in the eye are some of the possible reactions to Ozurdex. This eMedTV Web article lists other side effects of Ozurdex, including potentially dangerous reactions that require immediate medical care.
  • Ozurdex Uses
    As this eMedTV page explains, Ozurdex is approved to reduce the inflammation associated with macular edema caused by retinal vein occlusion. This article also lists other uses for Ozurdex and gives a complete overview of how it works and who can use it.
  • Ozurdex Warnings and Precautions
    After receiving the Ozurdex implant, it's important to keep all of your follow-up appointments. This eMedTV segment explains why and lists several other warnings and precautions to be aware of before starting treatment with Ozurdex.
  • Pegaptanib
    Pegaptanib is a drug that is used for treating an eye condition called age-related wet macular degeneration. This eMedTV resource discusses the effects of the medicine, describes how it works, and explains what you should know before using it.
  • Pegaptanib Dosing
    Your dose of pegaptanib will be administered through an injection into the affected eye or eyes. As this eMedTV segment explains, while pegaptanib dosing varies from person to person, most people start with a dosage of 0.3 mg, taken every six weeks.
  • Pegaptanib Sodium Injection
    An injected medication, pegaptanib sodium is used for the treatment of age-related wet macular degeneration. This eMedTV page gives an overview of this medication, with information on possible side effects, dosing, and more.
  • Perforated Cornea During LASIK
    An extremely rare complication of LASIK is a perforated cornea. During LASIK eye surgery, as this eMedTV Web page explains, a perforation, which can vary in size and may lead to severe vision loss, occurs in less than 1 out of 1,000 cases.
  • Possible Risks and Outcomes -- Cataract Surgery
    Possible major complications are introduced in this video clip.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Alcaftadine
    This eMedTV Web segment explains that if you are breastfeeding or have certain allergies, you may not be able to use alcaftadine eye drops. This article takes an in-depth look at the other important precautions and warnings with alcaftadine.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Bimatoprost
    Bimatoprost should be avoided if you currently have eye inflammation. This page on the eMedTV Web site lists more precautions and warnings with bimatoprost and includes other information on who should not use this prescription eye drop.
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